Working Time

The Organisation of Working Time Act 1997 governs all aspects of working time such as rest periods, weekly rest breaks, Sunday working, maximum working time and record keeping. Employers need to ensure that they are fully compliant with all aspects of working time legislation and in the event of an inspection from the National Employment Rights Authority (NERA) to be in position to produce the necessary records to show compliance.

SFA Guideline on Working Time

This guideline is designed to provide employers and managers with a reference document dealing with the Organisation of Working Time Act 1997. The Act was drawn up to comply with an EU Health and Safety Directive, and it is important to bear this in mind when considering the purpose of the legislation. Part II of the Organisation of Working Time Act 1997 sets out .. Read more


OWT1 Form

Section 25 of the Organisation of Working Time Act 1997 (“the Act”) imposes a duty on employers to maintain records which can show compliance with the provisions of the Act. The Organisation of Working Time (Records) (Prescribed Form and Exemption) Regulations 2001, which were effective from 1st November 2001, put a structure on that duty. They specify the kind of records that must always be kept by .. Read more


Rest Break Exemption

The Organisation of Working Time Act (Records) (Prescribed form and exemptions) Regulations (2001) place a number of obligations on employers in respect of recording employees' working hours, start and finish times, rest breaks, public holiday entitlements and annual leave periods. However, many employers are unaware of a useful exemption under the Regulations regarding the recording of rest breaks. An employer may rely on this .. Read more


Sample form on double employment

Under Section 33 of the Organisation of Working Time Act 1997, employers are prohibited from employing employees to work on any day or during any week where the employee has worked for another employer or other employers and where the aggregate of the periods worked exceeds that permitted by the legislation. Offences under the Act may render both the employer and the employee liable to prosecution. A person found guilty under this Act faces fine of up €2,500 on summary conviction... .. Read more



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